Numerous reports have come in from around Missouri stating that they've heard loud booms today (July 14, 2021).

I first saw this shared about an hour ago on a storm chaser Facebook page.

The Facebook posting, as of the publication of this article has more than 375 comments. The page admins say

Reports coming from North Kansas City, Osceola, Sedalia, Springfield, Lake of the Ozark’s.
Possible Earthquake as some maps show, nothing official from USGS

With so many caves in Missouri that sometimes include industrial work being done in them, loud noises are not exactly rare. There is also the possibility that a jet moving at a high rate of speed could have caused a repercussive sound.

If I were more of a conspiracy theory type of person (OK, so I really am), I would wonder if this might be booms created by earthquakes. That really is a thing as documented by the USGS. New Madrid fault line, I'm looking at you.

The Wichita Eagle reports on similar booms heard in March of 2019:

Dispatchers have answered “numerous” 911 calls from people reporting the “boom,” KMIZ reported. Those calls, which came “from a geographically diverse area” in Boone County, started coming in just before 11 a.m. Monday, the station reported.

The Columbia Police Department posted on Twitter at 11:32 a.m. that it was “aware of the loud ‘boom’ in the Columbia area.” Police, along with the fire department and Office of Emergency Management, are investigating the noise, the tweet said.

Those booms, as well as the most recent ones remain unsolved.

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