Do you remember the Summer of 2012?  If you don't, let me remind you. It was BRUTALLY hot.  From late June into early July, there was basically no rain and the thermometers soared into triple digits for multiple days in a row. Working outside was incredibly dangerous.  I distinctly remember doing remote broadcasts and just standing perfectly still because it was so miserable.  And, it was dangerously dry.  That was the year that many local governments banned the use of fireworks because of a very real threat of fire.  To paraphrase a saying often used here in the Owensboro area, "It was hot, Don!" That year, we had fourteen days in the Evansville area where the temperature was 100 degrees or higher.

Ten years later, it's going to get really hot again.  And, while we may not see numbers quite like that, our AC units are going to be working overtime for the next week or so.

National Weather Service
National Weather Service
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A Heat Advisory takes effect this morning at 11am and will remain in effect for days. The National Weather Service in Paducah is warning of excessively hot temperatures and heat indexes.

Though this next graphic isn't from the National Weather Service (it's from my phone), it will give you a quick summary about what we're expecting through early next week.  Like I said, "It's hot, Don!"

Chad Benefield
Chad Benefield
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Now, here's what the National Weather Service specifically has to say about the heat wave.  We're to expect "daily heat index values of up to 110 degrees or higher."

National Weather Service
National Weather Service
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Now, the good news (if you can really call it that) is that, at least right now, we are expected to cool off a little bit by Friday. That's when the high is supposed to drop to around 93 degrees.  Saturday, when we'll get even more relief, the high temp is expected to top out in the upper 80s.

But, we have a lot of excessive heat to get through before then and the National Weather Service is encouraging folks to use caution.

National Weather Service
National Weather Service
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Obviously, we'll continue to monitor the National Weather Service forecast and touch base with our weather partners at Eyewitness News. You can stay up-to-date with our station app, which you can get here.

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LOOK: The most extreme temperatures in the history of every state

Stacker consulted 2021 data from the NOAA's State Climate Extremes Committee (SCEC) to illustrate the hottest and coldest temperatures ever recorded in each state. Each slide also reveals the all-time highest 24-hour precipitation record and all-time highest 24-hour snowfall.

Keep reading to find out individual state records in alphabetical order.

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