I don't know about you, but to me, there's something so fascinating about abandoned places.  I love looking at photos from when people go urban exploring.  I'm in a group on Facebook that shares a lot of abandoned cool places around the state of Indiana. The group is called Abandoned Central and Southern Indiana, and if you're a fan of abandoned places you'll definitely want to check it out these photos!

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Recently I saw a post in the Facebook group that piqued my interest because of how incredible the photos were.  The post was by a person named Leif LaVan, they had recently checked out the Anderson Athletic Park Pool that opened in the 1920s but closed in 2007.  The photos they took of the pool are fascinating, and I had to share them. Luckily Leif gave me permission to share the photos with you!

I've tried to do a little research on the pool, but haven't found a ton. I do know the pool is almost 100 years old, it dates back to 1925, and closed it's doors in 2007. I did find an article from The Herald Bulletin the pool has since been added to the Indiana Landmarks' 10 Most Endangered list.  They also say that the pool was designed by engineer Wesley Bitnts who patented the egg-shaped-above-ground pool that tucks the dressing rooms underneath for a sleek design.  According to the article from The Herald Bulletin, only a handful of these unique pools remain standing.  This one at the Anderson Athletic park being one of them.

I hope this pool in Anderson can be saved, or at least preserved, because it was built almost 100 years ago, and has so much interesting history with it.

*WARNING: Under no circumstances should you enter this property. By doing so you risk bodily harm and/or prosecution for trespassing on private property.

See Eerily Beautiful Photos of This Abandoned Pool in Indiana

In the town of Anderson, Indiana sits the pool in Anderson's Athletic Park. The pool was built in 1925, but closed in 2007. For the last decade-plus, the old building has sat deteriorating. All photos were captured by photographer Leif LaVen unless otherwise specified.

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