My mother passed away in July after 87 years of doing everything that she ever set out to do in her lifetime.

WORLD WAR II THROUGH MY MOTHER'S EYES

She was living history and was always quick to share stories from her nearly nine decades on this planet. Let's face it...between 1933 and 2021, she saw firsthand how this country and the world changed. Radio to television to microwave ovens to the Internet and beyond.

One story of hers I always enjoyed was from when she was eight years old. It was Sunday, December 7th, 1941. When she and my aunt and my grandmother came out of church--presumably after 12 noon--there was a newsboy with an "extra" edition of the Owensboro newspaper. Of course, you must know what the headline was on the front page. It was for a story detailing the attack on Pearl Harbor. December 7th became, as President Franklin Roosevelt said in his famous speech the next day, a "date which will live in infamy."

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PEARL HARBOR -- "A DATE WHICH WILL LIVE IN INFAMY"

It is arguably the most impactful day in American history prior to September 11th, 2001.

A couple of years ago, we took a Tri-State Bucket List trip to Evansville to tour the magnificent WWII LST-325, a vessel rife with history.

To think I was standing where so many important figures in the United States' involvement in the Second World War stood just gives me cold chills. It was an honor to be on board

The Clint Eastwood film Flags of Our Fathers used actual equipment from the ship as props.

TOURING THE WWII LST

I thought it would be nice to pay tribute to all those who lost their lives that day 80 years ago by re-posting this video.

LOOK: 100 years of American military history

KEEP READING: Scroll to see what the big headlines were the year you were born

KEEP READING: Scroll to see what the big headlines were the year you were born