Okay, I know you're thinking "I don't pay for any of my apps" and that's right, most apps like the one you might be using right now are free. What you may not know is, while the apps are free, some will impose fees asking users to use their software and subscribe to other services.

The Supreme Court ruled on Monday, consumers can pursue a lawsuit over the costs of iPhone apps. Apple has over 2 million apps and they get a 30 percent commission which the Court ruled could unfairly drive up app prices. That commission doesn't include the developer's cut.

Again, this doesn't affect all apps. It's always a good practice to look at the developer information and specs.

Apple's side of the argument is that they don't control app developers; the developers set the prices. The App Store has been one of the company's fastest growing divisions.

There were only 500 apps when the App Store started in 2008. Meanwhile, iPhone sales have dropped after the first quarter of this year.