Contact Us

The Internet Stages A Blackout To Get Your Attention: SOPA and PIPA

Wikipedia and hundreds of other websites are blacked out today to protest legislation that would strictly regulate content on the internet (Annie Jenkins)

Some of the most popular websites are “going black” today to protest a bill that’s up for a Senate vote on January 24. At issue is the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and if it passes it will change the internet, and the way we all get information.

To begin with, this is all about pirated movies and music, which makes sense. It is and should be illegal to view movies and listen to and download music that you didn’t pay for (anyone remember Napster?).

ANY CHARACTER HERE

ANY CHARACTER HERE

But the language of SOPA doesn’t stop with just pirated movies and music and that’s the problem. The language of the bill, (and a similar one currently working its way through congress called Protect IP Act {PIPA}) is too ambiguous, leaving entirely too much room for interpretation and abuse of the law.

In the simplest terms, if passed, SOPA, would allow absolutely anyone with copyrights to any image, in any form, to complain to any law enforcement agency that the image is being used on a website without its consent. The agency would be required by law to force whomever is using the image to shut down.

But the law doesn’t stop there. Any site that has been linked to that same image would also be force by the same law to also shut down, essentially shutting down the internet.

In layman’s terms, remember that picture of the kids you took at Holiday World in front of the entrance to the Pilgrim’s Plunge sign last summer that you uploaded to your Facebook page so grandma could see it in Toledo, Ohio, could force Facebook to shut down along with a thousand other websites that copied the picture and cropped out the image of the Pilgrim’s Plunge sign because it was a great picture of the entrance to the ride.

Your 10-second, Kodak moment in July just shut down the internet. Thanks a lot!

Leading the online protest against SOPA is the online encyclopedia, Wikipedia. For the next 24 hours the English language version of the site will be offline, completely unreachable. Its founder, Jimmy Wales, explained to CNN’s Erin Burnett why Wikipedia, which is used by 24-Million people per day, is stepping up to protest SOPA.

 

Even the White House has issued a statement about SOPA and the impact it would have on the global internet. Sites like YouTube, Twitter and Facebook would go offline immediately if SOPA or PIPA passes.

To stop SOPA and PIPA from passing, call your Senator today and tell them to vote ‘NO’ on January 24.

More from Newstalk

Best of the Web

Leave a Comment

It appears that you already have an account created within our VIP network of sites on . To keep your points and personal information safe, we need to verify that it's really you. To activate your account, please confirm your password. When you have confirmed your password, you will be able to log in through Facebook on both sites.

Forgot your password?

*Please note that your points, prizes and activities will not be shared between programs within our VIP network.

It appears that you already have an account on this site associated with . To connect your existing account with your Facebook account, just click on the account activation button below. You will maintain your existing profile and VIP program points. After you do this, you will be able to always log in to http://newstalk1280.com using your Facebook account.

*Please note that your points, prizes and activities will not be shared between programs within our VIP network.

Please fill out the information below to help us provide you a better experience.

Register on NewsTalk 1280 WGBF quickly by logging in with your Facebook account. It's just as secure, and no password to remember!

Not a Member? Sign Up Here.

Sign up for an account to comment, share your thoughts, and earn points to get great prizes.

Register on NewsTalk 1280 WGBF quickly by logging in with your Facebook account. It's just as secure, and no password to remember!