It’s Friday afternoon --  you’ve tied up most of the loose ends you still have hanging over your head from the work week, but nevertheless, the weekend is upon you and it is quitting time.

So, you shut down your computer, tell some of your co-workers goodnight and move on to bigger, better and more exciting adventures, right?

Wrong.

That’s because your boss has your email address, and according to recent study by Right Management, he not only plans to use it, he expects a response.

In a survey of nearly 600 employees in the United States and Canada, researchers discovered that nearly 40 percent of employees say they are frequently harassed by pressing, need-a-response-now type emails from their bosses on the weekends.

"It's one thing to get broadcast or informational emails after office hours, but it’s now a given that everyone has to check their emails at least once a day, Saturday and Sunday included," said Michael Haid, senior vice president of talent management for Right Management.

Researchers say that unfortunately, the weekend no longer belongs to the employee, as technology has made it so that work is never too far away.

However, it is important that everyone in the office understands employee communication expectations.

"If your work environment calls for employees to be in touch around the clock, then it’s important everyone shares that same understanding," said Haid. "But if you are a boss that's working on the weekend because that is just your style and your only time to catch up, then let employees know if it's okay for them not to respond during their down time."

Haid also adds that in exchange for employees being required to answer work emails from home on the weekends there should be some flexibility allowed in the office throughout the week. Otherwise, workers run the risk of burnout.

[Business News Daily]